Trusting the Weaver

Corrie Ten Boom is true hero of the Christian faith. Her life story is well documented in The Hiding Place.

When Corrie spoke to audiences about her experiences she would often look down while she talked. She did this because she was always working on a piece of needlepoint. After telling her story of the cruelty in the German concentration camps and the death of her father and sister, Corrie would hold up the needlepoint for everyone to see.

The backside of her handiwork was a jumble of colors and threads with no discernible pattern. With this came the observation that “this is how we see our lives.” She would then turn the needlepoint over to reveal the intended pattern visible on the front. Then Corrie would conclude by saying: “This is how God views your life and someday we will have the privilege of seeing it from His point of view.”

Corrie also wrote a poem related to her needlepoint story: 

My life is but a weaving between my God and me,
I do not choose the colors, He works so steadily,
Oft times He weaves in sorrow, and I in foolish pride,
Forget He sees the upper, and I the underside.

Not till the loom is silent, and the shuttles cease to fly
Will God unroll the canvas and explain the reason why.
The dark threads are as needful in the Weavers skillful hand
As the threads of gold and silver in the pattern He has planned.

When our perspective on the present is less than clear, may we trust the Weaver who sees things from an eternal perspective!

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4 Comments

Filed under Suffering, Trust

4 responses to “Trusting the Weaver

  1. Victor

    Richard,
    Thanks so much for posting this. Both Corrie’s testimony and this poem
    have been so meaningful in bringing me into deeper faith during dark
    and confusing times.
    Just as a side note, according to Roy Lessin of “Meet Me in the Meadow”
    (http://www.meetmeinthemeadow.com/2012/02/the-master-weavers-plan/)
    the author of the poem was Benjamin Malachi Franklin 1882-1965. He wrote the poem in the late forties. It was first published in ‘The Memphis Commercial Appeal’ newspaper in 1950, per his grandson Bob Corley.

    Thanks again

  2. Sharon from Australia

    I agree this is a beautiful poem. Just thought I’d let you know that there is another paragraph at the end of the poem:
    He knows, He loves, He cares,
    Nothing this truth can dim,
    He gives His very best to those
    Who leave the choice to Him.

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